Tools for Cooks – Book Review

Have you experienced this before – you’re curiously inspecting an unknown kitchen tool, not knowing its function and how it is used in the middle of the kitchen section of a departmental store? Certainly it’s true for me. Some come in cute sizes or colourful designs, we are definitely spoiled for choices. That’s why a book as such comes in handy – Tools for Cooks (2007).

toolsforcooks
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Book Description:

Overwhelmed by the vast selection of kitchen tools, pans and knives to choose from? This expert, independent guide helps you t make informed choices on the correct cookware, utensils and tools for every important cooking task, whether it be roasting a chicken, baking bread or making fresh pasta.

– Over 500 kitchen tools, utensils and cookware ranging from basic essentials that no kitchen should be without to specialist equipment required for today’s eclectic styles of cooking.
– Expert guidance on what to look for when buying kitchen tools and how to use each one.
– Over 100 photographed delicious recipes and illustrated step-by-step techniques show how to use many of the tools.
– Top chefs and cooks reveal their favourite tools, with recipes contributed by many well known names including Raymond Blanc, Alain Ducasse, Ken Hom and Charlie Trotter.
– Invaluable advice on storing and caring for tools, plus cook’s tips and safety guidelines.
– Trusted advice on the latest designs keeps you up-to-date with technological innovations, plus guidance on traditional tools that have stood the test of time.
– Extensive lists of specialist suppliers and retailers help you find the many items in this book.

Review

A fine tool is a treasure. It curves to the hand, balanced, ready for action and treasures do not always come cheap. It’s one of the great pleasures of life, both inside and outside the kitchen.“, a foreword by Anne Willan; the book systematically opens up the path to a new and exciting culinary experiences for the least informed or the misinformed.

The content structure is marshaled into 13 functions – 1) materials choice, 2) cutting, grating and peeling, 3) grinding, mashing and crushing, 4) mixing and whisking, 5) sieving and straining, 6) boiling and steaming, 7) braising and stewing, 8) frying and grilling, 9) roasting and baking, 10) dough making, 11) moulding and shaping, 12) measuring and weighing, and 13) storing food.

The approach of each section is straightforward – starts with a brief explanation on the function, followed by the introduction of the tools and expounding on the methodology if there should be any and backed with recipes to explain its application.

In a nutshell, it’s a complete book with clear illustrations, sensible text as it provides a thorough guide on how and why choosing the right utensils while recommending the proper handling methods and storing tips for extending its durability.

Here’s a site to get a copy.

Source:

Christine McFadden. Tools for Cooks (London, Jacqui Small, 2000, 2007), 7, 10.

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